How To Apply For Australia Skilled Immigration

Travel Uncategorized  How To Apply For Australia Skilled Immigration

By way of introduction, Australia has a number of pathway to getting permanent resident status but the easiest is the skilled migration.

Skilled migration, as the name implies means opportunity for both “academic skilled and technical skilled” people to migrate legally and permanently to Australia. The program was originally designed to address skill shortages in the country generally, so they came up with a system that attracts people who can meet the minimum requirements.

There are five visa subclass in the skilled migration pathway namely Subclass 189 (Independent), 190 (State sponsored), 489 (Regional/nominated provisional), 132 (Business Talent) and 188 (Business Innovation and investment, provisional).

I will be talking strictly on the first three. See link for Australian Border Force’s website for the skilled migration.[ http://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Work/Skill]

The three visa subclass, 189, 190 and 489 are for professionals, technologists, artisans and trade workers who can meet up to minimum of 60points for 189, 55points for 190 and 50 points for 489. I will explain how the points are calculated, occupation list and application in the subsequent posts.

The skilled migration program is a point based system and requires minimum of 60 points for you to be invited to apply. The points are calculated below:

1. AGE:

18 – 24 years (25 points)

25 – 32 years (30 points)

33 – 39 years (25 points)

40 – 44 years (15 points)

45 – 49 years (0 points)

2.ENGLISH LANGUAGE ABILITY:

To prove that you have competent English you must provide evidence of one of the following:

a. You hold a valid passport issued by the United Kingdom, the United States of America, Canada, New Zealand or the Republic of Ireland and you are a citizen of that country.

b. You have achieved a score of at least 6 in each of the four test components (speaking, reading, listening and writing) in IELTS

c. You have achieved a score of at least ‘B’ in each of the four test components of an Occupational English Test (OET).

d. You have achieved the following minimum test scores in each of the four test components: 12 for listening, 13 for reading, 21 for writing and 18 for speaking, in a Test of English as a Foreign Language internet-based test (TOEFL iBT).

e. You have achieved a test score of at least 50 in each of the four test components (speaking, reading, listening and writing) in a Pearson Test of English (PTE) Academic

f. You have achieved a test score of at least 169 in each of the four test components (speaking, reading, listening and writing) in a Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) test that has been undertaken on or after 1 January 2015 and prior to
lodging the visa.

2.2 PROFICIENT ENGLISH (10 Points):

To prove that you have proficient English you must provide evidence of one of the following:

a. You have achieved a score of at least 7.0 in each of the four test components (speaking, reading, listening and writing) in IELTS.

b. You have achieved a score of at least ‘B’ in each of the four test components of an Occupational English Test (OET).

c. You have achieved the following minimum test scores in each of the four test components: 24 for listening, 24 for reading, 27 for writing and 23 for speaking, in a Test of English as a Foreign Language internet-based test (TOEFL iBT).

d. You have achieved a test score of at least 65 in each of the four test components (speaking, reading, listening and writing) in a Pearson Test of English (PTE) Academic

e. You have achieved a test score of at least 185 in each of the four test components (speaking, reading, listening and writing) in a Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) test that has been undertaken on or after 1 January 2015 and prior to
lodging the visa.

2.3 SUPERIOR ENGLISH (20 Points):

To prove that you have superior English you must provide evidence of one of the following:

a. You have achieved a score of at least 8.0 in each of the four test components (speaking, reading, listening and writing) in IELTS.

b. You have achieved a score of at least ‘A’ in each of the four test components of an Occupational English Test (OET).

c. You have achieved the following minimum test scores in each of the four test components: 28 for listening, 29 for reading, 30 for writing and[b] 26[/b] for speaking, in a Test of English as a Foreign Language internet-based test (TOEFL iBT).

d. You have achieved a test score of at least 79 in each of the four test components (speaking, reading, listening and writing) in a Pearson Test of English (PTE) Academic

e. You have achieved a test score of at least 200 in each of the four test components (speaking, reading, listening and writing) in a Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) test that has been undertaken on or after 1 January 2015 and prior to
lodging the visa.

3. SKILLED EMPLOYMENT:

To claim points for skilled employment you must have, in the 10 years before you were invited to apply, at least 20 hours of paid work per week in your nominated skilled occupation and/or a closely related occupation.

Skilled employment is where:

The relevant assessing authority provides an opinion in your suitable skills assessment that your employment is skilled (you must use the date that skilled employment commenced stated in your skills assessment) your employment experience meets the standards for skilled employment set by the relevant assessing authority.

0 – 3 years experience.. (0 Point)

3 – 5 years experience.. (5 points) At least 3yrs but less than 5 years

5 – 8 years experience.. (10 points) At least 5 years but less than 8 years

8 – 10 years experience. (15 points). At least 8 years.

4.QUALIFICATION

Doctorate from an Australian educational institution or other doctorate of a recognised standard. 20 points

At least a bachelor degree from an Australian educational institution or other degree of a recognised standard.. 15 points

Diploma or trade qualification completed in Australia 10 points

An award or qualification recognised by the assessing authority in the assessment of the skilled occupation 10 points

5. Australian Study Requirements- This is only for those who studied or are studying in Australia
One or more degrees, diplomas or trade qualifications awarded by an Australian educational institution and meet the Australian
study requirements 5 Points.

6. OTHER FACTORS

A. Credentialled community language qualifications 5 POINTS

B. Study in regional Australia or a low population growth metropolitan area (excluding distance education) 5 POINTS

C. Partner skill qualifications 5 POIINTS

D. Professional year in Australia for at least 12 months in the four years before the day you were invited to apply 5 POINTS

7. NOMINATION/SPONSORSHIP (WHERE REQUIRED)

A. Nomination by state or territory government (visa subclass 190 only) 5 POINTS

B. Nomination by state or territory government or sponsorship by an eligible family member to reside and work in a specified/designated area (visa subclass 489 only) 10 POINTS

You will begin to ask yourself, what do I do after knowing how the points are calculated. The first step is to know whether your skill/occupation is among the skills/occupation required or needed for migration.

There are two (2) types of list which I will explain below.

1. Skilled Occupation List (SOL)… Find the link below

https://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Work/Work/Skills-assessment-and-assessing-authorities/skilled-occupations-lists/SOL

2. Consolidated Sponsored Occupation List (CSOL)…. Find the link below.
https://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Work/Work/Skills-assessment-and-assessing-authorities/skilled-occupations-lists/Cool

[b] With effect from 19 April, 2017, the SOL/CSOL lists have been replaced with Medium and Long Term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL) and Short Term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL). Continue reading for links and details.

Where your occupation is in any of the two lists will determine what subclass you can apply for. If you see your occupation in MLTSSL list, you can apply for subclass 189, if it is on STSOL list, you can apply for either 190 or 489 which are states/regional areas sponsored visa.

However, you can find your occupation in both list, it means you can apply for any of the three if you don’t meet up to 60 points on your own, you will need either 5 or 10 points from State or Regional area as the case may be.

1. If you are applying for Visa subclass(es) 189, 489 (Family Nominated) or 485 (Graduate work stream), you must nominate an occupation on the Medium and Long Term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL). Find link below
http://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Work/Work/Skills-assessment-and-assessing-authorities/skilled-occupations-lists/mltssl

In the MLTSSL list, there are 16 occupations with double asterisk. This means that these occupations are not available for a 457 sponsored visa in the new structure.

2. Although there is no separate list for Short-Term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL), however there is a combined list of eligible occupations for those seeking to apply for Visa subclass(es) 190 and 489 (State or Territory nominated).

These two are our business on the list. Below is the link to the list
http://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Work/Work/Skills-assessment-and-assessing-authorities/skilled-occupations-lists/combined-stsol-mltssl

If your occupation can only be found in the combined occupation list (STSOL), it means you require a state or territory government to sponsor you. The link below has the websites of all the States. Check each to confirm if your occupation is being sponsored by any state.
https://skillselect.govspace.gov.au/2013/04/26/i-am-seeking-state-or-territory-government-nomination

On the list, in front of each occupation is ANZSCO code and Assessing authority. The code is the occupation code for easy reference and the assessing authority is the body responsible for assessing your claimed skill/occupation and qualification.

Once you find your occupation on any of the list and in the case of STSOL, there is a state sponsoring it, go to the assessing authority website to know requirements needed for your assessment.

Each assessing authority has different requirements, so it is not a one size fits all. All the assessing authority can be reached by clicking them on any of the list (it will direct you to their website). Below is the link to all the assessing authorities.
http://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Work/Work/Skills-assessment-and-assessing-authorities/assessing-authorities

Some assessing authorities require that you meet a minimum level in English language by writing IELTS/TOEFL/OET/PTE while some do not require English language score.

Detailed information can be found on your assessing authority’s website.
Because you need points from English language test, there is no rule as which is to do first, either write English or assess your skill. However, for those that their assessing authority requires English language test, you must write one first before submitting application for assessment.

If your body doesn’t need the test before assessment, you can write later or same time as assessment. Endeavour to score at least a proficient score as outlined above to get minimum of 10 points depending on your circumstances.
Once you get a positive response/assessment from your assessing authority, you are 80% done with the application.

Next step is to fill in the Expression of Interest which can be found in the link here https://skillselect.gov.au/SKILLSELECT/ExpressionOfInterest/PreReg/Start

After filling the EOI, wait to be invited, once invited, apply for your visa… do medical test and police report, then wait for your visa approval, which unlike before is no longer slow to be approved.

If you are diligent and follow the process through, it should take you maximum of 9 months from scratch to visa approval going by the current trend.

1 COMMENT

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here